WirelessPirate.net

Fun without wires

Archive for the ‘nokia 6230’ tag

WirelessPirate Goes International

without comments

As of this Friday, I’ll be heading off on an intense trip around the world. I’ll be out and about for nearly a month and a half, and I will hopefully be posting from all over the place in that time.

My new iBook is going with me, as is my AirPort Express, Nokia 6230 and HP iPAQ H5550. I’ll be stopping off in Honolulu (Hawaii), Sydney (New South Wales), Perth (Western Australia), Singapore, London (England), Chicago (Illinois?), Minneapolis (Minnesota), Los Angeles (California), Las Vegas (Nevada). Some of those are just lay-overs, some are for longer stays (a couple days). It should be interesting to say the least.

It will be interesting to see what access is like in different places, and hopefully spot some cool technologies around the place. Stay tuned to hear the latest as I progress 🙂

Written by Beau Lebens

December 1st, 2004 at 4:00 pm

Playing with my Logitech Bluetooth Mobile Headset

without comments

My headset got here today, Amazon don’t mess around!

On first appearances – totally cool 🙂 It is a big big/bulky when you put it on (sticks out from your ear a bit, and waggles when you flick your head around), but it sits nicely, and feels quite comfortable, so it’s ok, and like I mentioned, I don’t need it to be ultra-sleek anyway. The case that it comes with is really cool – doubling as a charging cradle and travel protection case. I plugged it in and got it charging while having a quick look at the manual. Nothing too interesting, basically one button handles everything, it’s just a matter of how long you hold it down.

Pairing the headset with my phone (Nokia 6230) was extremely easy – just put the headset in discoverable mode (turn off, then hold down the magic button until the light flashes blue + red), then tell my phone to search for available enhancements (via the Bluetooth menu). A pairing code is required, but that’s just ‘0000’, as the manual states. Enter that and you’re off.

Then I started noticing some problems… browsing around with the headset connected, I’d get the volume indicator come up randomly, repeatedly. Turns out that the headset was disconnecting and reconnecting every couple of seconds.

I thought I’d give it a go with my iPAQ (H5500). Very similar process, equally simple. Headset into discoverable, then on the iPAQ you go to the Bluetooth Manager, make a new connection, select ‘Headset’ as the type. You need to search for it, then enter the pairing code (0000) and you’re connected. I chose not to bother with a secure/encrypted connection, since it’s just audio.

2 seconds later, I hear the tone on the headset that says it’s disconnecting, then another 2 seconds and it connects again. Same problem as with my phone – repeated disconnect/reconnect.

Since I was still at work at this stage, I decided I’d leave it until I got home to have a proper look at things.

When I got home, I had the chance to also try connecting to my PC. Now of the 3 different connections I have available, I at least expected my PC to work. I’m connecting a LOGITECH headset, to my computer, via the LOGITECH Bluetooth Hub. Guess what – same problem. I can pair it perfectly, and it thinks it’s connected, but then it just disconnects and reconnects again and again.

I’ve emailed Logitech tech support, but from my experience, they’re not very good. Amazon are going to have a return on their hands in the near future I think. Fingers crossed that the Logitech people just send me a new one or something, because I definitely think it’s something wrong with the headset. 3 attempted connections; 3 of the same faulty connection problems; sounds like a firmware problem to me!

Written by Beau Lebens

July 24th, 2004 at 4:00 pm

Configuring a Nokia 6230 for T-Mobile USA Service

without comments

  1. It’s not officially supported by T-Mobile, so don’t bother calling support, they’ll tell you to go buy one of their handsets.
  2. Go to the online T-Mobile Configurator and follow the steps to configure details.
  3. Once you’ve had the details sent to your phone, make sure you activate them or nothing will change!

Why T-Mobile support couldn’t have told me to try their impressive online tool is beyond me, but they didn’t even mention it. Oh well, thank goodness for the Internets!

Written by Beau Lebens

July 20th, 2004 at 4:00 pm

Nokia 6230 Bluetooth Mobile/Cell Phone

without comments

Nokia 6230 - specs @ nokia.com.auAs I mentioned in a previous post, I got a new phone before I left Australia, the Nokia 6230. I got it because it had Bluetooth, took video and photos, and was tri-band (so it would work in Australia and the US). Unfortunately, because I am on a pre-paid T-Mobile, I don’t have access to data or multimedia messaging, so it limits the cool things that I can do with my phone, but it still rocks, and is way ahead of most of the handsets available here, which was a bit of a surprise.

Some of the cool things that I like being able to do with my phone;

  1. Take a photo and then Bluetooth it to my iPAQ for editing, saving etc
  2. Dial a number on my phone, directly from my iPAQ
  3. Synch the Contacts (phone numbers etc) from Outlook on my PC, across to my phone – I always have every number I know about on hand now
  4. Use the loudspeaker/speakerphone – it’s surprisingly useful
  5. Take photos to use for my wallpaper!
  6. Play mp3s – can’t help it on that one, had to add it 🙂

So basically, I think it was a great purchase. Being stuck on T-Mobile (because they are the only ones I can find here that will allow me to bring my own handset, and use their SIM), and paying a fair bit for my calls sucks, but it’s bearable to keep using the phone, ’cause it’s so much better than the other stuff around here (and I paid for it outright man, I’m not going to retire it already!).

If you’re looking for a nice-sized, sturdy, full-featured phone for use in Asia, Australia or America, then the Nokia 6230 is your man 🙂

Written by Beau Lebens

July 4th, 2004 at 4:00 pm

The Bluetooth Triangle

without comments

After getting my diNovo and getting it set up, I suddenly had Bluetooth on my desktop PC. So – what to do, I couldn’t very well just leave it there only running my mouse and keyboard, I had to see what else I could cook up. First step was easy: iPAQ.

I got my iPAQ transferring files quite easily, and after some tinkering with simulated COM ports and whatnot, I now have it so that I can do a complete ActiveSynch via Bluetooth, which is pretty cool I reckon. I just turn BT on on my iPAQ, then go to the synch program on it and say “Synch via Bluetooth” and off it goes. I have it and my desktop in a paired, trusted relationship, so they don’t ask for any passphrases or permissions or anything now. I can right-click on files and say “Send to… Bluetooth device” and send a file directly to my iPAQ as well, which is handy if I just want to throw one additional file over there, rather than doing a complete synch.

When it was time to move overseas, I decided it was also time for a new phone (possibly a bad move, but that’s another story about the tyranny of telecommunications companies and their strangle-hold on the market). I decided to get a Nokia 6230 for a couple reasons, mainly photos + video + bluetooth + tri-band. I installed the Nokia PC Suite 5, which includes the Nokia PC Synch and some other bits and pieces, and again, after some fiddling around with simulated COM ports, had it synching up with my PC (Outlook)’s Contacts and Calendar entries. Now I get 2 warnings for things, one on my iPAQ and one on my phone :). The best part though is that it means every contact number I have in my PC, is also available on my phone, which is a great thing to have.

So my Bluetooth Triangle consists of my desktop PC, which includes Bluetooth mainly to drive the keyboard and mouse, but which provides a central connection point for my phone which synchs in contacts and calendar items, as well as the ability to transfer photos and videos (and MP3s, since it has a media player built in), and my iPAQ, which does complete synchronisation with the desktop. I also can use my iPAQ to edit images taken with my phone’s camera by simply ‘toothing them over to it, working away, then ‘toothing them back – easy!

Written by Beau Lebens

June 30th, 2004 at 4:00 pm