WirelessPirate.net

Fun without wires

Archive for the ‘stumbling’ tag

Wifi Stumbling on iPhone 3GS

without comments

WifiTrak for iPhone 3GS

WifiTrak for iPhone 3GS

I’m currently in Santiago, Chile on an extended trip, and trying to “work from the road”. That’s easier said than done, and there are a number of things you’ll be looking for when you’re trying to set up a temporary office in a cafe or other location. One of those things, obviously, is wifi. A lot of places are nice enough to have a sticker on their window, or some other indication that they have wifi available for guests to use, but it can get tiresome walking around peeking in windows trying to find signs of life.

The solution that I’m currently using it to employ my iPhone 3GS as a stumbling device/wifi scanner. I looked around on the iTunes store for a while and the best (99c) application I could find that actually works on the iPhone 3GS, doesn’t require a data connection of some sort, and is a true scanner (not a location-based look-up against known APs) is WifiTrak.

I can turn on WifiTrak and then walk around an area that I know has some cafes etc, and quickly get a scan of all the wifi in the area. It’s easy to spot open/protected APs (although a lot of the protected ones here will give you a password if you ask), and to see relative signal strengths. It automatically sorts the APs located by signal strength, so you get the strongest ones at the top. You can even connect to a network directly from the app which is a nice touch, although I’m not using that since it’s really just for scanning purposes.

Written by Beau Lebens

December 18th, 2009 at 1:33 pm

Posted in Uncategorized,WiFi

Tagged with , , ,

Wardriving Software

without comments

This post was inspired by an email from David W (who I can’t reply to for some reason – the email is not getting through). I wanted to have a quick look around the place to see what software is available for stumbling/wardriving/network scanning etc. Here’s what I came up with;

Net Stumbler
The pre-eminent stumbling program for Windows machines, Net(work) Stumbler appears to support a wide variety of wifi cards, presents useful information (including a graph of signal strength over time) and supports GPS input to pinpoint the location of the WAPs you are detecting. I use Net Stumbler with my Netgear WG511 card, on a Sony VAIO laptop, running Windows 2000 and it works excellently (including GPS data now!)
Kismet
As far as I know, Kismet is the favourite *NIX stumbling/scanning tool, and “supports raw monitoring (rfmon) mode, and can sniff 802.11b, 802.11a, and 802.11g traffic”
MacStumbler

“MacStumbler is a utility to display information about nearby 802.11b and 802.11g wireless access points”. Apparently works with Apple Airport Card and MacOS 10.1 or greater.

There are heaps more than those ones, but they are the big-boys as far as I can tell. As I mentioned, I use Net Stumbler, because I have a Win2k laptop, and it works with my card. So far, so good! I’d like to hear what other people use and any problems they’ve run into with certain packages?

Written by Beau Lebens

March 5th, 2004 at 4:00 pm

First Stumble With GPS!

without comments

First GPS war-drive

I’ve just been on a short stumble/war-drive with my GPS unit for the first time, and here’s the results (using my standard format).

  • 7 different SSIDs scanned
  • 11 unique MAC-addressed nodes scanned
  • 4 WAPs encrypted with WEP [36%]
  • 3 WAPs using what appear to be default SSIDs [27%]

I’ve also included the actual Net Stumbler log (exported as wi-scan, with extensions [summary format]) for interest, which includes the co-ordinates of each point. At the moment I can’t map anything, so I can’t do a lot with the data, but it’s there if anyone else can do something with it 🙂

Written by Beau Lebens

January 15th, 2004 at 4:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,

Stumbler Code of Ethics v0.1

without comments

This is a good document for people to have a look at before they go out stumbling their area. It’s basically the code of conduct that I use when I’m out there;

World Wide War Drive Stumbler Code of Ethics v0.1

Written by Beau Lebens

December 1st, 2003 at 4:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,

First War-Ride

without comments

Well, I needed a ride, and I hadn’t scanned for any networks lately, so I thought it’d be a good chance to combine the two and try something new. I rigged up my laptop with a new power profile, whacked in the headphones, slapped it all in my backpack and rode off into the night (being 8pm and all) to stumble for networks through the middle of Perth (expecting it to be a relative hotspot).

I wasn’t disappointed with my findings, and below is a small, standardised summary according to the format that I’ve used in other stumbles. I’ve also included a map of the ride route, with a few interesting points marked on it for reference.

  • 31 different SSIDs scanned
  • 59 unique MAC-addressed nodes scanned
  • 32 WAPs encrypted with WEP [54%]
  • 7 WAPs using what appear to be default SSIDs [12%]

As you may notice, the percentage of WAPs using WEP is much higher than previous stumbles, and the percentage of default SSIDs is much lower. I would most likely attribute this to the commercial nature of the majority of these nodes (see ride route below), which went through the main business street of the city. I suppose at least some businesses are securing their networks 🙂

A couple of interesting observations from the results;

  • 3 ‘WesWiFi’ devices were located when passing Wesley (private school); all of which were NOT encrypted
  • An SSID called ‘HayStNet’ was scanned, which sounds like a rather ‘community’ sort of a thing, but it was encrypted, so I wonder what it is
  • Cino To Go 182 has a WAP, which is not encrypted, and I am assuming that it provides public Internet access (marked on map)
  • The Chifley Hotel appears to provide free/public Internet access as well, since their SSID is ‘Chifley Public Wireless Internet’ (marked on map)
  • Posh Nosh, a cafe at the West end of St George’s Tce, provides access via the HotSpots network, but it’s paid access, and from memory is something like $20 for 2 months!
Complete map of the war-ride.
Close-up of the city part of the ride, including what appear to be public access sites.

I will definitely have to go for another war-ride soon, it was very fun indeed. There are a few things to watch out for;

  1. Heat: I stopped 3 or 4 times on this relatively short ride for a little break, but also to take my laptop out of the bag and let it cool down a little bit. Being in the enclosed space for that long means that it heats up.
  2. Power Profile: I customised a special power profile for handling my laptop, which basically tells it to never hibernate or suspend the drive, but to turn off the LCD screen and keep running when the lid is closed, with the CPU running in ‘battery-saving’ mode. This way, I can close it all up and tuck it away in the bag without worrying about it suddenly going to sleep 🙂
  3. Damage: Be very careful riding around on a bike with your laptop in a backpack – if you fall off, think about how you land, you really don’t want to roll in any way, or fall directly on your back, because your laptop will most likely be crushed.
  4. Headphones: Getting the volume level takes some tweaking, and it’s kind of hard because it needs to be up louder so you can hear it while riding, but when you slow down or stop it will be very loud. It also gets a bit much if you have 16 APs dinging away at you all at once (like I did!), so you might be better of turning off the MIDI mode in Net Stumbler
  5. GPS: Just thought I’d mention it again – I really want one 🙂

Ok, that’s enough for now – more write-ups later on some more of my equipment, namely my backpack and laptop, which I realised I haven’t really talked about yet.

Written by Beau Lebens

November 5th, 2003 at 4:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , , , ,

Long-Distance, High Speed Stumbling (Staggering?)

without comments

I did a wardrive along a main highway (Stirling Hwy) all the way from Mosman Park to Freeway South, then down the freeway, off at Mill Point Road, down Labouchere Road and stopping at my house. Average speed would have been around the 60 km/hr pace, and here are the results;

  • 14 different SSIDs scanned
  • 19 unique MAC-addressed nodes scanned
  • 9 WAPs encrypted with WEP [47%]
  • 4 WAPs using what appear to be default SSIDs [21%]

I really want to get a GPS device of some sort so that I can start mapping these points properly, because at the moment all I can really do is either try to map them manually, or just live with only the details of what is found, rather than where it was found.

Written by Beau Lebens

October 27th, 2003 at 4:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,

Stumbling Around My Neighbourhood

without comments

Well, the first day that I got all my wireless equipment, I actually went for a bit of a wardrive around my neighbourhood, and found the following (interesting) details;

  • 20 different SSIDs scanned
  • 35 unique MAC-addressed nodes scanned
  • 8 WAPs encrypted with WEP [23%!]
  • 10 WAPs using what appear to be default SSIDs [29%]

I really want to get a GPS device of some sort so that I can start mapping these points properly, because at the moment all I can really do is either try to map them manually, or just live with only the details of what is found, rather than where it was found.

Written by Beau Lebens

October 27th, 2003 at 4:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,